fireproofing log home Protecting your Home from Wildfire
Careful planning and preparation will ensure your home escapes a blaze

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In the limited time available during a fire, firefighters have to be selective about which homes they try to save, says Tom Fields, the fire chief in Camano Island, Washington. Most wildfire-fighters practice the triage system, fighting first for the homes that can be saved without unnecessary risk to fire personnel. If forced to make a choice, they’re less likely to take on a home where the driveway is too narrow or steep for a quick getaway or where tree branches hang over the driveway, or where combustible brush is too close to the house.

The Fleuriets’ home is well-situated, and that’s one of the things that saved it. Firefighters had clear access on the gravel road leading to the home. They bypassed homes located on winding roads where fire might have trapped workers and equipment.

To make sure your home lands high on the triage list, evaluate potential hazards and minimize or eliminate them. A home’s chances for survival can be greatly improved with planning, design and landscaping. The swiftness of wildfire threatens any home in its path. It doesn’t take a miracle to survive a wildfire; it takes putting into practice firewise, common-sense procedures.


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