Journey to Lost Loon Lodge

By J.K. Lawrence
Photos Courtesy Alpine Log Homes

It was a long journey for John and Sue and their three daughters, but the family finally has a home in Wisconsin’s northwoods. John began traveling the highways leading to the lakes “up North” when he was just 9 years old.

“Over the years, I said to myself that if ever I could afford it, I wanted to build a nice place in the northwoods. I wanted us to be able to enjoy the beautiful scenery, the closeness, the sense of family it always seemed to create.”

With small, well-placed steps, John and Sue began their extensive journey to their beloved land and lakes. Over the years, the couple planned vacations and fishing expeditions with their daughters, John’s brothers and their friends. Family members shared John’s dream and collected ideas for the log home they would have one day.

The lodge began to take shape in their minds as they clipped pictures and made notes regarding camps and cabins they visited. In 1996, the couple purchased lakeshore property and put into motion plans for building the long-awaited camp, which later became known as Lost Loon Lodge.

Inside Out
John and Sue collaborated on the home’s design with builder Dan Benson and the architectural team at Alpine Log Homes, a company steeped in the tradition of handcrafted log homes like those that dotted the lakes of John’s youth. The team worked together to make design choices that would reflect the family’s love for the outdoors and unite architecture with nature.

  • Broad decks attached to the great room, grillroom and master bedroom give each room a scenic view of the natural world beyond the home.
  • Furnishings inspired by local hunting lodges and fishing camps. Black and red buffalo plaids — like those used in wool sporting jackets — are scattered throughout the house.
  • Greenhouse windows in the kicthen provide plenty of sunlight and gorgeous views.
  • The grillroom, located just a few steps from the kitchen is a sunroom, screened porch, outdoor kitchen, cocktail bar and casual dining space all rolled into one. Made of glass walls and doors, the room has easy-to-care-for stone floors that absorb the sun’s heat.

To read the fully story of Marauders’ building project, check out the March 2004 issue of Log Home Design Ideas.