You know all about keeping those gorgeous logs looking good on the outside. But what about the inside of your home? It turns out that the old saw about an ounce of prevention being worth a pound of cure rings true. With thoughtful design, many potential maintenance challenges can be avoided; beyond that, ongoing maintenance requirements should be fairly minimal. Here’s a look at what you can expect.

log home interior

Protective Stain

  • A water-based acrylic stain is best because it allows wood to breathe and provides a tough film that can be dusted and cleaned easily. It also never yellows.
  • Areas susceptible to water damage may need alternative treatments. A clear polyurethane coating in the bathroom and other splash zones prevents water damage and discoloration of any chinking.

Proper Ventilation

  • Kitchens need to be well-ventilated because the oils that are released during cooking and float through the house can discolor cabinetry, ceilings and other nearby wood.
  • The rest of your home should be ventilated, but you don’t want drafts bringing in extra dust.

Wood Moves

  • Wood shrinkage and compression cause movement, but manufacturers account for minor movements in the wood. Interior wood should have enough time to acclimate to temperature and humidity before it’s attached.
  • Keep you home at an appropriate temperature and humidity.

Preventing UV Damage

  • Selecting Low-E glass (glass with coating to block ultraviolet rays) for windows and doors prevents discoloration of interior wood.
  • Use a "UV boost" with the initial coat of stain on log walls and floors.