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Divine Restoration

By Jay Uhlenbrauck
Photography by Roger Wade

Dan Boyd had life pretty well figured out by age 10. His plans may have seemed little more than boyhood dreams, but he had every intention of carrying them out.

“In a third grade essay titled ‘What I want to be when I grow up,’ he wrote about becoming a dentist and living in a log cabin,” recalls his wife Betsy.

Family Room- FloortoCeiling WindowsHe later proved if you pursue boyhood dreams long enough, they become reality. When Dan graduated from dental school in 1972, he and Betsy bought 130 acres of farmland in Waynesville, North Carolina complete with a pond. The couple envisioned adding a quaint cabin next to the quiet pond and surrounding it with lush perennials and flowering trees. Not just any cabin would do, though. The Boyds weren’t interested in a new log home.

Dan and Betsy spent the next 15 years piecing together historic cabins to create a 4,000 square foot log home that marries modern convenience with pioneer-era logs and Colonial style.

Design Ideas
The reconstruction required the Boyds to be creative in their design choices. Here are some ideas that they came up with to update their home to suit their needs while maintaining its authenticity:

  • Logs were pressure washed, but not stripped or stained to keep them as natural as possible.
  • A kitchen and two upstairs bedrooms were built with logs Dan recovered from other cabins. A two-story Colonial style cabin from Dandridge, Tennessee was added on to double the living space and create a more colonial feel.
  • Raw farmland was transformed into a finely landscaped work of art — complete with gardens, ponds and plenty of country charm.

To read the full story of the Boyds’ building project, check out the July 2004 issue of Log Home Design Ideas.