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Design a Cozy Eating Nook

by: Rachel Machacek | Log Home Living OK, so if you haven't heard by now, the formal dining room is out. Kaput. History. Why would you dedicate that much space to a room you use three times a year? In an effort to help reclaim the square footage that's been getting sucked down the drain […]
by Rachel Machacek
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by: Rachel Machacek | Log Home Living

OK, so if you haven't heard by now, the formal dining room is out. Kaput. History. Why would you dedicate that much space to a room you use three times a year? In an effort to help reclaim the square footage that's been getting sucked down the drain by stuffy tradition, we present the casual culinary format: the eating nook.

Bump Out
Heidi Long photo

Don't let the diminutive nature of the word "nook" fool you. These spaces come in all shapes and sizes, and we will even allow that one type of nook — the radial bay — is actually its own room, though conservative in the amount of space it takes up.

Bump outs, built-ins and custom-room shapes should be designed into your floor plan ahead of time, so plan for your nook by having an idea of what kind of seating you'll need. And don't just focus on the interior—some of these ideas will affect the exterior of your home, too, by adding depth and new shapes to the elevation.

The Bump Out
Nudging a wall out as little as 2 feet and throwing in a window transforms this kitchen corner into a hot spot. The effect of having the dining table half in and half out of the kitchen instantly connects the indoors to outside, and the view alone over a steaming mug of coffee would get you out of bed in the morning.

Design Hint:
Instead of covering the exposed log ends with a post or trim, keep the cross section exposed for a rustic look.

Alcove
Rocky Mountain Log Homes photo

The Alcove
The nook is open to the kitchen in its entirety, though the table and chairs are effectively out of the workspace, making the eating space it's own distinctive space.

Design Hint:
To create the effect of a distinct room that's separate from the kitchen, simply use a different flooring material in the nook.

Radial Bay
Rocky Mountain Log Homes photo

The Radial Bay
Even if you don't go the formal dining room route, you can still devote an entire (and separate) room to your eating nook. The idea is simply to make it a space that you will use often and not sequester for special occasions. This radial bay has the feel of eating outside with its high ceiling and focus on natural materials.

Design Hint:
Radial bays work well when they're situated off a corner of the footprint. Use stick-frame construction to save money (log corners can be costly) masked with log siding or stone.

Built In
Cindy Thiede photo

The Built In
A bay window is prime seating when you add a built-in U-shaped bench. The table tucks in with just the right amount of leg room (when you're planning the built-in, it's helpful to have an idea of the size and shape of the table you'll be incorporating) and only requires one pull-up chair.

Design Hint:
This setup is ideal for smaller rooms, especially when paired with a fold-down table that doubles as a console.

Published in Log Home Living
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One Response

  1. Exactly what we did! Love it.

    Chantal DespresAugust 25, 2011 @ 3:58 pmReply



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