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A Place in the Sun

Sunrooms are a natural fit in log homes. Log homes, by design, exude a sense of light and air, and sunrooms open up the home with lots of windows. A sunroom will usher in the outdoors, which the log structure itself expresses naturally.   When considering the inclusion of a sunroom, the top priority is […]
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A Place in the Sun


Sunrooms are a natural fit in log homes. Log homes, by design, exude a sense of light and air, and sunrooms open up the home with lots of windows. A sunroom will usher in the outdoors, which the log structure itself expresses naturally.


 


When considering the inclusion of a sunroom, the top priority is to figure out where it goes. Sunrooms heat up faster than other rooms, so when and how the sun’s rays flood the room affects your comfort—and heating bill.


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Most sunrooms feature a southern exposure that aids passive solar heating. They’re also typically in the back of the house because that’s where home owners are more likely to enjoy the features that first attracted them to their home site—a lake, woods, mountain view or big backyard.


 


Also, think about the location in proximity to nature itself. Building near shade trees, windbreaks and hills can help with the ever-present issues of energy efficiency and climate control.


 



  • Sunrooms draw in light, but rounded logs don’t reflect light the way flat white walls do. Your plan should help you maximize the natural light.

  • Overhangs are typically constructed long enough to reduce heat radiation in warm weather and increase it during the chilly months. A good width ranges from 3 to 3 1/2 feet.

  • Hot air rises, so if you don’t want the heat to stay at the ceiling, install duct

Here are some other ideas to keep in mind when planning your sunroom:



  • work in the floor and ceiling fans pushing the warm air back down. If you want cool air to fall, consider putting your air conditioning near the top of walls.

  • Conserve energy naturally: Excavate under the floor and fill that space with washed rock. During the day, heat is pulled into the rocks; night the heat radiates back up, warming the room.

The complete article appears in the 2006 July issue of Log Home Living.


 






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